That Summer Feeling #24

I’m writing this in advance of the weekend, so forgive me if it’s absolutely wazzing it down, it seems this hot spell is due to continue for a while longer at least (cue: snow), so here’s a song I mentioned in a previous post, and one that I first heard via that “Now That’s What I Call Summer” album I purchased back in the mid-80s.

This almost made into my recent Summer Friday Night post, just so I could do it half-way through and pretend it was an actual ad-break going on at the start. Cos I’m THAT funny:

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Barracudas – Summer Fun

More soon.

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Friday Night Music Club

Evening all.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, it can’t have escaped your attention that the Olympics start officially later tonight (if you count the opening ceremony as it starting) or tomorrow (if you count it as starting when the competitions actually do).

Of course, whichever opinion you subscribe to, you’re wrong, for the Olympic football tournament started two days ago, but since this is generally being ignored here in the UK as Team GB didn’t qualify (did we even try…? Couldn’t have been a more humiliating experience than Euro 2016 was, I guess), you can be forgiven for that.

Anyway, pack me a lunchbox and call me Linford, I’ve only gone and done us a Friday Night Olympic playlist. Try to contain your joy.

So here goes, 12 songs which are (very) (tenuously) linked to the Olympics. And no sign of that bloody Spandau Ballet record anywhere.

First up, no surprise that I’ve managed to crowbar this lot in:

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355. Super Furry Animals – (Drawing) Rings Around The World

Of course, the opening ceremony climaxes and the Games truly commence when the Olympic flame arrives at the stadium, transported in one of these (the song title, not the band):

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356. Soft Cell – Torch

The majority of the games involve a race of sorts (I think. I dunno. I haven’t checked). So here’s this lot:

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357. The Flaming Lips – Race For The Prize

Next, a song which is actually about a motor race, which means it isn’t a race that appears in the Olympics (I think. I dunno. I haven’t checked), but the theme is roughly the same. Plus, I’ve not heard it for ages:

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358. Cake – The Distance

The objective of any of the sports hosted at the Olympics is to win a medal, preferably a gold one, which is given to the winner:

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359. Shed Seven – Going For Gold

…or failing that, make do with second place, which earns you…

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360. Echo & The Bunnymen – Silver

…which is another way of saying….

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361. The Jesus & Mary Chain – Almost Gold

…which is still one better than coming third, and getting:

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362. Queens of the Stone Age – The Bronze

Mention the name “Queen” and one other band springs to mind, a band who famously had a song which actually mentions an actual Olympic sport, albeit somewhat colloquially, in the title. But I’m not playing Queen tonight; instead this rowdy lot:

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363. Be Your Own Pet – Bicycle Race

Straight on to the next one, which surely needs no explanation:

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364. Sugababes – Push The Button

Okay, maybe a little explanation.

In 2012, on the night of the opening ceremony, I was at a works party. The party had nothing to do with the Olympics, and was held in the beer garden of a local pub, whilst TV screens in the bar showed the opening proceedings. I have to admit, in the run up to the games, I was firmly in the “We’re going to make a right pig’s ear of this” camp, and had little to no intention of watching any of the games. However, the appointment of Danny Boyle, he of Trainspotting, Shallow Grave and Slumdog Millionaire fame, to direct the opening ceremony piqued my interest, and every time I went to the bar – which was often – I found myself watching the television, bordering on the entranced.

I got home later that night, found it on the BBC iPlayer, and watched it right through.

Sort of.

The next morning, I woke up on the sofa, my television on stand-by, and watched it again/properly. I hadn’t been mistaken. It was bloody amazing.

Soon after the Games finished, I bought a copy of the DVD box-set. The first disc contains the opening ceremony, the other two the highlights of the games. The first is possibly the most watched DVD that I own. The other two haven’t even been out of the box.

Why is this relevant? Well, the other night I had a text from Hel, asking if I’d watched the BBC documentary about the making of the ceremony. I hadn’t, and sat down to watch it the following night.

For the next couple of hours, I was transfixed, in exactly the same way as when I first watched the actual opening ceremony. The documentary, part of Alan Yentob’s “Imagine” series, contains behind the scenes footage, including the teaching of all the thousands of volunteers, some of whom had to learn to dance, others to drum; it has interviews not just with all the main creative players (Boyle himself, Underworld’s Rick Smith who was the musical director, etc. etc.) but also with several of the volunteers, some of whom have moving stories to tell about why they were there, and what happened to them on the night and as they trained for it. For example, in the “Saturday Night/Music” sequence, which tells the story of a boy and a girl meeting on a night out: I had assumed that both of them were trained actors/dancers. But no: both just normal kids, who’d volunteered to take part, and had been picked from the masses to play a major role in the event.

But there was one scene which stuck in my mind, filmed in the tunnel where the volunteers involved in the aforementioned sequence were waiting to enter the stadium. Out there, the Sugababes’ “Push The Button” is playing; in the tunnel, they are going mental, all bouncing up and down with excitement, singing along and cheering…it’s wonderful to behold. If you have chance to watch it, I urge you to do so. You won’t be disappointed.

So, that’s why the Sugababes are here. They’ve probably changed line-up about seven times since I started writing that, mind (obligatory Sugababes revolving line-up joke, there).

Back to a song which I don’t really think can be criticised for being included in a playlist on an Olympics theme:

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365. Gene – Olympian (Single Version)

That is just majestic.

And so to round things off, a song from my favourite album by this band (a controversial choice, I believe), which I dedicate to every athlete from every nation taking part. May you hear yours many times over the next few weeks.

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366. Radiohead – The National Anthem

More soon.

The Chain #14

Ok, folks, here we go with your weekly dose of virtual interaction, a day later than I promised. So, I’m unreliable. Guess you’ll just have to put up with that.

To refresh your memories, last week I asked you for records you can link to The 101’ers “Keys To Your Heart”.

First out of the traps this week was CC, with this suggestion:

“Keys to my Heart to Heart of Glass by Blondie to (I love the Sound of Breaking Glass) by Nick Lowe off Jesus of Cool to She Left Me for Jesus by Hayes Carll”

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Hayes Carll – She Left Me For Jesus

Never heard that before. Not bad at all, cheers CC.

Next up, The Swede:

“Double link alert! The 101ers were so called because the band lived together in a squat at 101 Walterton Road in Maida Vale. Assuming Walterton Road ran odd numbers on one side of the street and evens across the road, one of their neighbouring houses would have been Number 99. So how about ‘Other 99’ by Big Audio Dynamite, fronted by (here’s that second link folks) Joe Strummer’s future partner in crime, Mick Jones.”

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Big Audio Dynamite – Other 99

Good stuff. I have to admit pretty much all of B.A.D.’s output passed me by, bar “E=MC2” so it’s good to have a pointer for where to start in the event that I ever muster up enough enthusiasm to investigate further.

Next up, is George, who writes:

“In binary code 101 is equivalent to the number 5 in the decimal system. There was a pop group from the 1980s called Five Star………I’m going to start again………..”

Ah. Okay. We’ll come back to you when you’ve had chance to ponder a while longer.

In the meantime, the mere mention of Five Star brings out a Pavlov’s Dog type reaction in me, but instead of salivating and looking hungry (which are pretty much my default settings anyway), I can’t resist posting this. Yes, again:

Whilst George is a-pondering, here’s The Swede, again:

“I got quite excited for a moment there, thinking that George might suggest ‘Mind Your Own Business’ by Delta 5. Then it all went horribly, horribly wrong.”

It seems The Swede, building upon Swiss Adam’s multiple suggestions last week,  has stumbled upon another way to get more than one record played here: suggest what you thought someone else might have suggested before they’ve actually suggested anything. You’ve got to admire his chops, haven’t you?

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Delta 5 – Mind Your Own Business

Nothing further from George at this point, so while we wait, here’s The Great Gog:

“If you didn’t want the key to someone’s heart, you could always Throw Away The Key (a slightly under-achieving hit for Linx in 1981). The lead singer of Linx was David Grant who enjoyed further solo hits, and a couple of duets with Jaki Graham. That then leads me to Graham Parker, and linking back to heart, The Beating Of Another Heart from 1980’s The Up Escalator.”

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Graham Parker – The Beating of Another Heart

And now George is ready:

“Here goes. 101 in binary is 5. And The Tympany 5 were Louis Jordan’s backing band, and the song Ain’t Nobody Here But Us Chickens” before clarifying: “That’s 101 in binary is 5 in the decimal system. 101 in base 4 is 17 in base 10.” But we all knew that, right?

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Louis Jordan – Ain’t Nobody Here But Us Chickens

I trust you’ll all agree that was worth the wait.

And now, I’m delighted to be able to finish off this week’s suggestions with two first-timers to this mullarkey.

First, we have What’s It All About, Alfie? who writes from the North of Scotland – a country which seems to have more than its fair share of entertaining bloggers – but having had a darn good rummage around their blog I’m none the wiser as to their identity. I think – given a recent post was about Jackie magazines – that the blog is written by a lady. If so, I’m even more pleased because, bar Marie’s suggestion back on The Chain #10, we’re a little light on female contributors. (And if not, ermm…sorry!)

Anyway, here’s their suggestion:

“First thing that came to mind was 808 State – Pacific State, just because they also have a palindrome number (is it still called that if it’s not a word?) in their name.”

Doubtless you’ll all know that the song in question is know under several guises: “Pacific 707”, “Pacific State”, or just plain “Pacific”, (and for completists/pedants, one called “Pacific 808 98”, which is practically a drum and bass remix) but that matters not a jot here since it’s the band name we’re concerned with. So I’ve gone with the Pacific 707 version, partly because we then have two of those pesky numerical palindromes for the price of one, but mostly because it’s the best postable copy I have:

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808 State – Pacific 707

That’s bloody marvellous, isn’t it?

But we’re not done just yet, for finally another suggestion from another lady, who – get this – doesn’t even write, nor has she ever written, her own blog.

“So when my little pigeon brain heard the word keys in the title “Keys to your heart” I immediately thought of a song that features a key quite frequently and is a wonderful camp euro dance classic (if that’s even an official music genre). It just reminds me of dancing with my best friend, Simon in G-A-Y many years ago “The key, the secret” – Urban cookie collective.”

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Urban Cookie Collective – The Key, The Secret

“Quite frequently” is a bit of an understatement, isn’t it?

I have to admit to having a bit of a soft spot for that one too, as it goes.

So, welcome to you both, thanks for joining in, and please feel free to make suggestions in the future. And to any other non-bloggers out there who read this, think of a link then don’t post it for whatever reason, please do: I’d love to hear – and play – your suggestions (and I will, provided the link stands up to scrutiny and I can track down the song in question if I don’t already own it).

Ok, to my own suggestion, and if the 101’ers have got the Keys to Your Heart, then before they can use them, they first need to cross the river to your heart by using the bridge to your heart, which luckily one-hit-wonders WAX built back in 1987:

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WAX – Bridge to Your Heart

And by posting that, I hope I’m proving to any possible contributors that your choice doesn’t have to be good to get posted! (But I bet you’ll all have the chorus to that running round your brain for ages now).

So, to round things up for another week, here’s the official selection, which I love, but which none of us got anywhere near. I’m quite pleased about that, as I love the diversity of your suggestions, so keep them coming, more power to your elbow etc etc etc.

Lifted from their timeless “Rum Sodomy & the Lash” album, here’s The Pogues:

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14. The Pogues – Dirty Old Town

(Sorry George, more Zippyshare-ness for you to contend with)

And the offical reason for that song? “Joe Strummer stood in for Shaun MacGowan as The Pogues’ vocalist on several occasions…” Our reasons, whilst slightly more convoluted, are way better than that, no?

So, your suggestions please, along with your explanation as to how the hell you got there, via the Comments box below, for songs to link to “Dirty Old Town” by The Pogues.

More soon.

Which Reminds Me…

Looking at the list of contributors on the sleeve of that Nitty Gritty Dirt Band album I featured in the Sunday Morning Coming Down post from this morning, one name leapt out at me.

There, bottom left, is the name Norman Blake.

That Norman Blake is one of the leading figures in the American bluegrass movement. It’s not the same Norman Blake who is a mainstay of one of my favourite bands ever: Teenage Fanclub.

Any excuse will do:

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Teenage Fanclub – Did I Say

“Did I Say” was specially recorded for the band’s 2003 Best of Album Four Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty-Six Seconds – A Short Cut to Teenage Fanclub”. Ordinarily, I’d be quite scathing about any band who added new material to a Best Of album, viewing it as a cynical marketing move to get genuine long-standing fans to buy it, as well as any newcomers to their music.

But I’m going to let Teenage Fanclub off, for three reasons:

  1. I bloody love that song
  2. It’s Teenage Fanclub, they can do what they like
  3. I went to see them promote the album in question in Bristol, and they played “Did I Say”. I stood, as I often do now I’m too old for venturing down the front, towards the back, near the mixing desk, where you get the best sound and view (which is why the mixing and lighting desk is there, after all), happily singing along, when the chap stood next to me tapped me on the arm. I assumed he was going to ask me to stop singing, but no: “Okay,” he said, “I’m going to have to ask: I don’t know this song, what is it?” I filled him in on the details, he thanked me, I felt somewhat smug and superior.

The blogosphere is getting quite excited right now, as the first new Teenage Fanclub album in six years, “Here”, is imminent (September 9th in the UK), and we’ve recently got our first proper taste of what to expect:

No surprises, then. Which is exactly what we want from them.

Norman himself has been honoured in a song, albeit with his surname slightly, deliberately, mis-spelt:

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I Was A King – Norman Bleik

How do I know it’s a homage to the Norman Blake from Teenage Fanclub, and not the bluegrass Norman Blake?

Well, for a start, it sounds exactly like a Teenage Fanclub record, albeit with a female vocal.

And also, because of this:

More soon.

Sunday Morning Coming Down

This morning, a Country staple, although actually a folk song (the line between Country and Traditional American Folk is often quite blurred), performed by one of the great Country family bands:

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The Carter Family – Wildwood Flower

It’s a song I’ve known since I was a kid, since it appears on a triple album my Dad owns. Credited to The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, a cursory look at the album sleeve tells you it’s an album which features collaborations with a whole host of country, bluegrass and folk folks:

81Bcq4+Ri-L__SL1500_The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band – Wildwood Flower

And that was the unmistakable (I hope, or I’m going to look pretty stoopid) sound of Mother Maybelle Carter singing the lead vocal.

As you can imagine with a triple album, there’s plenty more quality songs to choose from, so expect this to feature again, quite a bit, on this thread.

Or, to put it another way: More Soon.

Late Night Stargazing

A few years ago, when Chill Out albums were selling like hot cakes, there were several songs which you could absolutely guarantee would appear on every one.

There would always be at least one track from Moby’s “Play” album, something from Air’s “Moon Safari”, and this:

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Kinobe – Slip Into Something

The force is strong in that one. (Sorry, couldn’t resist.)

More soon.

Friday Night Music Club

Today is Andrew’s birthday. Andrew is my older/only brother.

For once I don’t have to take international time-zones into consideration to ensure that he reads my birthday wishes on the right day, for this year he’s home from India and back in the UK for a couple of weeks.

To mark the occasion, I’m travelling up to my folks for the weekend, and to inevitably spend Saturday night sitting up and drinking Jack Daniels with him. Often when I go home, I’ll prepare a playlist of stuff to listen to, but often this has to take into consideration what the ‘rents will put up with having to listen to. So I thought this week, I’d post a few songs here which remind me of my Big Bro because…well, he bought (most of) them when we were kids.

As I was choosing the songs to play tonight, it occurred to me that my musical evolution followed a pretty similar path to his. This is hardly surprising since I used to listen to his records in that period before I started buying my own on a regular basis. We both had: a dodgy rock stage, a dodgy pop phase, followed by some semblance of redemption by way of liking something approaching decent indie records (although he had more than a passing Goth phase too).

I’ve talked about some of the records from our shared past before, here and he even wrote about the songs he bought when he was younger here. I’ve tried to avoid the songs played on those posts and focus on the…less cool stuff. For a start, anyway.

(By the way: my file sharing service Cut Pi, seems to be becoming increasingly erratic, and doesn’t seem to recognise some of the mp3s as being mp3s. It’s been doing this for a while and I can’t work out why. Upshot is, some of the links are shared via Zippyshare. Hope they work okay. And George – you got your wish.)

So let’s break these into the aforementioned three sections.

The Rock Stage

Of course, he had bought AC/DC’s seminal 1980 “Back in Black” album, (and later owned copies of “Let There Be Rock” and “If You Want Blood…You Got It!” (an album title I always thought would have been better suited to Kiss or Alice Cooper) but I imagine you all know pretty much every song from that album, so I’ve plumped for this from their 1981 release, which pretty much sums up us at the time, the band, and how the start of tonight’s post is going to go:

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337. AC/DC – For Those About To Rock (We Salute You)

Shortly after we moved into what became the family home throughout our childhood (mid-1970s), our parents converted a part of the loft into what they christened “The Playroom” – which was fine whilst we were kids, when it housed Andrew’s model train set and my Dr Who toys, but a little embarrassing, in the way that teenagers find everything embarrassing, when they would suggest we took any friends who called round up to The Playroom, which by our teens housed a sofa, a TV and a record player.

At first, the record player was one of those old ones, with the arm that came across and held your next record on the spindle whilst the current record played underneath. But soon, Andrew had saved enough cash up to purchase his first stereo system, one of those with a radio, twin tape deck, a space for records to be stored, a silver beast housed in a teak cabinet with a glass door to the front.

This next album made regular appearances on both turntables; I preferred the album’s title tracks, whilst Andrew always loved this one, ironically, I like to think, given he spent 20-odd years in the RAF:

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338. Black Sabbath – War Pigs

Next, a song which he didn’t buy, but every time I hear it I am reminded of those formative years spent listening to records, and in particular one Thursday evening when we had been banished upstairs to watch Top of the Pops, on which this record appeared, and which led to the pair of us leaping up from the sofa and frantically playing air-guitar, in full on foot-on the monitor mode:

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339. Iron Maiden – Run to the Hills

The reason I think I remember that is because it was probably a turning point, where we both admitted to liking the same records as each other. Up until then, we hated, or pretended to, each other’s musical choices – dammit, we pretended to hate each other (that’s what siblings did when they were that age, right?), having many a play fight which spilt over into full on physical violence, as the snooker cue that I broke over his back once attests (Look, he was bigger than me, I was fully entitled to come tooled up, okay?). As does the broken violin bow we had argued over a few years earlier when we had both found ourselves learning the instrument at Junior School. (I know, I know – fights involving violin bows: it’s not exactly “Angela’s Ashes”, is it…?)

(As an aside: my friends Hel and Llyr went to the Reading Festival in 2005 when Iron Maiden head-lined. They watched them, and afterwards reported that the section of the crowd they were in were distinctly non-plussed by the veteran rockers. Lead warbler Bruce Dickinson, attempting to whip the crowd up into a frenzy would call “Do you remember this one…?”; the crown responded as one “Nope!”)

Particularly indicative of our love/hate relationship came one Saturday night in, I guess, the early 80s. Saturday nights were a family night, which we would spend playing records from my Dad’s record collection. As I’ve mentioned on numerous occasions, Dad’s taste is predominantly Country records, but there was/is diversity there: he likes a bit of jazz, some folk, some classical. There was a series of classical albums that he owned, a spin off from a BBC radio programme, called “The World of Your Hundred Best Tunes” (a name I toyed with giving this very blog, until I realised there may be copyright issues). We were categorically not allowed to bring our own records down to play. But my brother figured out a way round this, and got one song – a cover version of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony by the next band from their “Difficult to Cure” album – played. So offended was I that he had been allowed to have one of his songs played, but I hadn’t (as I had no rock covers of classical records) I spent the entirety of the song under the dining room table, kicking and screaming about “how unfair” it was. (“So Unfair” was, I’m reliably informed, mostly anytime my parents watch any Harry Enfield sketch involving Kevin & Perry, practically my catchphrase when I was a teenager. This was just me warming up, I reckon)

Obviously, I’ve mellowed with age. But I’m still not playing “Summertime” by DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince unless someone comes up with a bloody good reason to. And I mean bloody good.

Anyway, I’m not playing the Beethoven cover either; since they’re unlikely to feature again (more than once more) on these pages, I thought I’d plump for the big single from the same album:

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340. Rainbow – I Surrender

Rainbow were, of course, one of the many bands to rise from the ashes of Deep Purple, another band that we begrudgingly admitted to having a shared passion for back then. Again, Big Bro’s record collection featured several of their albums, but the first I recall seeing – and to this day, the only one I’ve ever purchased myself (Cheers Fopp (Cardiff  branch) and your ÂŁ2.00 shelf!) – was a compilation album called “Deepest Purple”, from which this one is lifted:

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341. Deep Purple – Woman from Tokyo [Single Edit]

And you’ll be relieved to hear, that’s the end of the Rock Stage…

The Pop Phase

…and perhaps less relieved when you see what comes next.

Luckily for you, I’ve talked before – here – about the fact that we both mysteriously somehow came to own our own copies of Billy Joel’s “An innocent Man” album, so I’ll spare you that.

Ditto, I’ve previously posted – here – the two songs from Cyndi Lauper’s “She’s So Unusual” album, which he also owned that are any good (and I’m not going to post “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun” as it annoys me even more than the aforementioned “Summertime”)

But here’s a song by a band I’ve never really liked but – and I can say this without fear of correction, as he denies remembering anything from our childhood – I’m pretty sure Andrew joined the fan-club of:

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342. Thompson Twins – Doctor Doctor

Twins, see? And there were three of them. Pfffffft. Funny guys (and a girl). (They were named after the characters from the Tintin cartoons, as everyone knows – The Ed)

Moving swiftly on, to a song which I had completely forgotten about until Brian over at Linear Tracking Lives! posted it a month or so in his wonderful alphabetical trawl through his own record-buying history.

Lifted from her “The Drum is Everything”, much was expected of Carmel and her brand of smoky, jazzy pop, but she feel by the wayside shortly after this was released (although I did pick up one of the singles from the follow-up album, which I’ll feature soon enough, and which utterly tanked):

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343. Carmel – More, More, More

I should at this point talk about the records by groups like The Go-Go’s which he brought back from a summer in America staying with relatives, working on their blueberry farm. Instead, I’m going to post something from an album which contains another of my most disliked pop songs ever by another group I was fairly indifferent to for much of their existence, but with the benefit of hindsight I can see did have some decent pop tunes, particularly in their early 80s synth-pop phase.

But the album Andrew bought by Eurythmics – “Be Yourself Tonight” – does not come from that period. It comes from their just-after-the-synth-pop-phase, and from an album which brought their only UK Number 1, the aforementioned disliked pop song “There Must Be an Angel (Playing With My Heart)” (It’s the over-singing that does my head in). The album spawned two other hits: “Would I Lie To You?”, which I posted recently, and this one, which I’d completely forgotten about until I came to write this, gave it a listen, and decided it’s not too bad at all:

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344. Eurythmics – It’s Alright (Baby’s Coming Back)

But there was one band from his pop period who loomed large. I believe they were the first band he ever saw live (albeit supporting The Police), and, as I mentioned a couple of weeks ago, a band I’ve got a bit of a soft spot for too:

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345. The Alarm – Where Were You Hiding When The Storm Broke?

It was The Alarm more than any other band, I think, that focused my brother’s attentions on records which were…well, let’s say more critically acclaimed shall we?

But first, two more bands that I remember compilation albums appearing amongst his burgeoning record collection. Neither need any introduction:

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346. The Rolling Stones – Get Off Of My Cloud

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347. The Jam – Down in the Tube Station at Midnight

I don’t recall which of these albums first surfaced on The Playroom’s record decks (ha! like it was anyway near as cool in there as that sounds), what I do know is that a) I have recently bought both of these albums on vinyl myself, and b) shortly after The Jam album appeared I remember laughing at my brother for wearing white socks, the only mod accessory one could get away with at our school. Still, at least he didn’t steal them, of if he did, he wasn’t dumb enough to get caught. Ahem.

But these were the first shoots of liking more credible records, for very soon, we were fully into stage three, where he has resided ever since.

The Road to Redemption

There’s only one place to start. The Alarm’s haircuts may have influenced his for many years afterwards, when he could get away with it, but it was the dress sense and image of one of the Sex Pistols that most captured his imagination. He was told many times that he looked like this sneerer, which I’m pretty sure always thrilled him, however indifferent he may have appeared to look.

It’s credited to Sex Pistols, but make no mistake, released in 1978 as the band were imploding, this is a Sid Vicious record in everything but name:

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348. Sex Pistols – My Way

And so, with his black hair sprayed vertically, skinny black jeans with black studded belt and black winkle-pickers or occasionally cowboy boots (which, if memory serves, were brown when he bought them, unable to source a black pair, and which he spent several hours glossing over with a tub of Kiwi black polish and an oily rag), there was only one place he was going to go next:

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349. The Sisters of Mercy – Alice

And of course, this lot, who we are both unified in our admiration of, so it seems appropriate this song occupies the 350th slot in this section:

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350. The Jesus & Mary Chain – You Trip Me Up

He also bought the one and only album by this next lot, who I mention because I cannot hear it without thinking of the summer I spent as an underage drinker, hanging out with him and his mates Rob and Phil, driving round Cambridgeshire’s village pubs, where no-one knew our names, pubs like The Barnwell Mill, which had a massive juke box, and only one record they liked upon it. Once they realised that it didn’t differentiate between the same song having been selected twice by different people, they realised they could have hours of fun, by simply playing this, over and over and over and over and over again, often leaving after they’d heard it once, leaving the rest of the drinkers to sup their way through it another 17 times:

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351. Sigue Sigue Sputnik – Love Missile F1-11

Gradually, our musical tastes have pretty much merged. At no time was this more apparent than when I was at Sixth Form, between 1986 and 1988. As I mentioned recently, on a nightly basis  I found myself preparing mixtapes to play in the Sixth Form common room the following day, and there was one album which Andrew had bought which was invaluable for that. For he is the only person I know to have bought the legendary NME C86 album when it came out (admittedly, he bought the vinyl version, not the original cassette only version, but props are still due).

This band featured on the album in question, but not with this song, which he both realised we loved within the last few years, when discussing how much the much-missed The Long Blondes reminded us of them:

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352. The Shop Assistants – Safety Net

In 1997, our paths crossed back at our folks house, and, presumably after they’d gone to bed we were either playing records, or more likely watching a music TV channel, this came on. I’d not seen him so enthused for some years (actually, I’d probably not seen him for years), and he proclaimed this “the new punk”:

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353. The Prodigy – Firestarter

At which point, I’d better draw things to a close. If I don’t, it won’t be his birthday anymore by the time I post this.

So, one last one, by a band I remember him going to see towards the start of their career, and telling me afterwards how he’d been to see a band who used bashing-themselves-on- the-head-with-a-metal-tea-tray as a percussion instrument. I’d be very surprised if this doesn’t get an airing tomorrow night:

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354. The Pogues – Boys From the County Hell

Happy Birthday Bro. See you tomorrow. I’ll bring the Jack Daniels.

And to the rest of you – well, as I’m away, it’ll be a little quiet around here for the next couple of days, certainly not as busy as it normally is of a weekend. If I have time to write them before I set off tomorrow, there will be a Late Night Stargazing and a Sunday Morning Coming Down, but no promises. Otherwise, The Chain will return on Monday, so you’ve got another couple of days to get your suggestions in if you haven’t done so already.

Til then, have a fab weekend.

Oh, and More Soon, obviously.