Do The Wrong Thing

One year ago tomorrow, I was admitted to hospital. This led to some posts where I tried to wring as much humour as I could from the sitution. This, combined with my more recent story about how I accidentally exposed my arse in a local convenience store, and as the dark nights are drawing in, led me to decide to share some more embarassing moments from the file marked “Oh, Jeremy…”

As a bit of a back-story by way of an introduction: years ago, when I still lived in Cardiff, I was out one night with a now ex-girlfriend and her friends. She was off dancing, and one of her friends shuffled along the seats towards me.

“Can I just say that you seem really nice, we all really like you and approve of you being with XXXX…” – I was quite pleased and surprised by this, for we all know that the hardest thing about a burgeoning relationship is convincing your new partner’s closest friends that you’re not an utter scumbag “…but,” she continued, “you’re your age and single, never married, no kids, so I guess what I want to know…”

It dawned on me, too late that, that wasn’t really going to be one of those “Gosh you’re so great” conversations, she was going somewhere with it and that somewhere involved a question I probably wasn’t going to like very much. I glanced around for an escape route, but found none.

“….is,” she continued, “what exactly is wrong with you….?”

“Well, if I knew that…” I said, allowing the sentence to tail off mysteriously, to become a semi-sentence, punctuating it with a shrug and a bemused smile.

I was pretty pleased with the way I dodged that particular bullet, having turned her question into a rhetorical one without her having any say in the matter. Then, just to let her know that particular thread could be pulled at no further, I quickly stood and added, “It’s my round, what are you drinking?”

Truth be told, I did know how that sentence ended. I knew what “that” was. It was my propensity to say or do something so ludicrously inappropriate as to ensure a second date would definitely not happen.

So. Here we go. Mum, Dad: here come the reasons there have been no grandchildren from my branch of the family tree.

Episode one (of too many).

I am out with some friends in Cardiff. They’re people I know pretty well, because they work and drink in my local pub; when they were working then I was generally sitting at the bar chatting to them, and often when they finished their shift they would join me. Let’s say that we gravitated towards each other, found the company perfectly agreeable, and so it went on.

The upshot of this is that I didn’t really know the people on the peripherals, the ones who only came into their orbit every now and then.

And so it was that I found myself in a different bar with these pub friends and a couple of other people that I didn’t know at all, but who, social chameleon that I am, I got on with.

As it happens, I was getting on with one lady in particular, who I quite fancied, and I thought I was getting reciprocal good vibes back from. I’ll not divulge her name, not for any ‘protecting the innocent’ reason, but because this many years after the event, I simply can’t remember it. Which sounds outrageous, but it isn’t: I’m pretty sure my brain has blocked me from recalling it, just in case.

So we’re sitting chatting, getting on very well, and all my friends are doing that thing where they flash you knowing looks from out of her line of vision every now and again.

We do the whole chit-chat thing – Are you from round here? What do you do for a living? Any brothers/sisters? You know the kind of thing – and this lady offers me these words in response to one of those questions:

“I’m a police officer.”

Now I thought I did quite a good job of disguising the startled look on my face, but she picked up on it.

“Don’t worry, I haven’t got my tazer gun with me tonight!” she breezed cheerily.

I afforded a smile, because that wasn’t what I was thinking. No, what I was thinking was that I must be carful not to inadvertently use any uncomplimentary references to the police as being The Pigs, The Filth, The Scum, or whatever.

Not that they are terms I would use under normal circumstances, but when you find yourself in a situation where you really shouldn’t say something, in my experience the temptation to do the exact opposite becomes almost irrisistable.

Tourette’s Syndrome is a condition with many levels, one of which is the inability to resist saying the most inappropriate thing in moments of social awkwardness. Often I think I have a much milder version, where the inappropriate thing pops into my head, but I just about manage to stop myself from blurting it out.

And resist I did; on this occasion I disguised my condition by telling her she certainly didn’t look like a police officer – meant as a compliment, and, I think, taken as one – but asked if it was okay to imagine her in the uniform. Flirting, I think it’s called, if a little over the line marked “Cheesy”. Ok, along way over.

This large slice of fromage didn’t deter her, and we chatted on for quite a while, to the point where we were practically separate from the rest of the group, not engaging with them at all, just engrossed in each other. We became such a satellite of the main group that we started up our own round of drinks, just me and her.

After a while, I had to excuse myself and visit the Gents. And that’s where things began to unravel.

I may have mentioned this before, but when I reach a certain level of pissed-ness – and I’ve always figured it was my body’s way of telling me to slow down – I sneeze.

Thirteen times.

In a row.

And my sneezes are not your discreet a-tish-oo-s but a loud blunderbus of an expulsion

I had made it known to some of my buddies that this is something that happens to me, hoping to generate some sympathy by embellishing it with the phrase “allergic to alcohol”, but instead their reaction was often to start betting on how many times I would sneeze this time.

On one night out, with a different group of friends, a sneezing fit commenced and they started putting money down. When the sneezes fizzled out after five or six, a pepper shaker was commandeered by whoever had bet on 13 being the winning number, and a line was chopped out on the table in front of me, which I duly snorted.

To no effect.

Except the next morning, I woke up with a woozy head, wondering why my nose felt like it was on fire.

But not this time, for this time I was in the Gents when the sneeze-fit struck. So I should be okay, right? Just stay in there until the phase had passed.

Except….one of the sneezes was so head-joltingly violent, that my glasses flew off and smashed on the floor.

I picked them up and, in between the involuntary spasms which continued, I examined them. Nope, they were beyond temporary repair.

I returned to a slightly blurrier bar, and to my seat. The young lady to whom I had provided such irresistably engaging company before my visit noticed the difference in my appearance, and asked what had happened to my glasses. I explained and we laughed it off. Result, thought I. Hurdle succesfully negotiated.

And then she asked me this: “And do I still look good without your glasses on?”

And before I had chance to properly engage my brain, I heard myself say the following words:

“Oh no. You still look like a pig to me.”

We all left the bar shortly afterwards; in the interim we didn’t exchange a single word, and I don’t really think I can put that down to her not fancying me without my glasses on.

I never saw her again, even when I got a new pair of glasses.

The Lemonheads (feat. Liv Tyler) – Hey, That’s No Way To Say Goodbye

Sadly, more soon.

Published by

Jez

Contact me by email at: dubioustaste26@gmail.com Follow me on Twitter: @atastehistory Or do both. Whatever.

12 thoughts on “Do The Wrong Thing”

  1. And there we go again – I now want to retract that little anecdote but can’t. Reading it back it all sounds a bit wrong but hopefully you get the jist. Oh Alyson…

  2. I mean, mine usually coincide with times I’ve been on the drink, but sure, Chemistry lessons are practically the same thing. In fact, you could probably count all my teenage years in there

  3. Oh Jeremy, indeed! I bet she’d never heard that uniform crack before either…
    But I know that feeling when there’s a little devil sitting on your shoulder which seems to be whispering in your ear and goading you to say something you shouldn’t, and really to say it *just* because you shouldn’t. Have managed to suppress it so far but can totally understand how it works, aren’t our brains weird?
    Wishing I had got here earlier too to read Alyson’s now deleted anecdote! Oh Alyson?! 🙂 Perhaps we should set up a dedicated blog solely for our embarrassing revelations, could be good therapy…

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