Late Night Stargazing

Over the past few weeks in the build up to the General Election, and occasionally before that, I’ve written posts about current affairs and posted a song which seemed vaguely fitting to accompany the piece.

I am conscious that some might construe a song I’m posting as an illustration of my thoughts, or even as a joke.

Which is why, after the events in London at the end of the week, the song I had lined up for tonight’s post suddenly took on a new meaning and seemed a very distasteful record to post, even though I had no intention of writing about the horrific tragedy that was Grenfell Tower. Yet.

So I have scrapped the intended song, in favour of the one which immediately precedes it on the same album. If you’re familiar with Underworld’s “Dubnobasswithmyheadman”, then you’ll know exactly which song has been bumped and why.

This is the version from the 2014 remastered release, a throbbing, pulsating classic:

Underworld – Dubnobasswithmyheadman

Underworld – Dark & Long (Remastered)

More soon.

A History of Dubious Taste – 1986

On to a record which actually came out in 1985, but I didn’t buy until the following year.

I remembered hearing “Once in a Lifetime” by Talking Heads on the radio when it was a hit back in 1981, and thinking it sounded like nothing else I’d ever heard. My interest wasn’t piqued enough to buy the thing of course – I was just entering my early years of obsession with the Quo at that point – and I don’t think I heard anything else by them again until “Road to Nowhere” came out in 1985. And I didn’t buy that (immediately) either.

Then two things happened. Firstly, “And She Was” came out. And secondly, I saw “Stop Making Sense”, unquestionably one of the greatest live film recordings of a band at the very peak of their powers.

Coincidentally, around about this time I was becoming more interested in buying albums rather than singles, but realising I would not be able to afford to buy every album that had a single on it I liked, I had developed a purchasing protocol: if I liked at least two singles from it, then it was probably worth investing in. Which meant that 1985’s “Little Creatures” had earned its’ place on my list of records I wanted to own.

At the time, though, money was a little short; I had yet to enter the job market on any meaningful level, although I did have a job delivering the local free newspaper once a week to the residents of the village I lived in, a job I had somehow inherited from my brother.

I say delivering, but it would be remiss of me not to admit that I got very bored of this job very quickly, and ended up stashing most of the copies anywhere I could (under my bed, in the garage), rather than spend three hours on a Wednesday night trudging round the locale. Who’s going to complain about not receiving their free newspaper, I reasoned.

Friends of my parents, that’s who.

Anyway, I digress. What I mean to say is that it took a little while to save up enough pennies to be able to afford the “Little Creatures” album, meaning I didn’t actually get hold of a copy until early 1986.

It’s possibly the most polished and commercial of their albums, probably not even my favourite album by them, but nevertheless here’s a couple of tracks from it:

Front Cover

Talking Heads – Stay Up Late

Talking Heads – And She Was

More soon.

Replenishing the Vinyl

I tried to stop myself, to wean myself away from scouring through pages upon pages of vinyl on ebay, but a couple of weeks ago, I had a moment of weakness. And I’m quite glad I did too, for I managed to pick up a signed copy of The Bluebells album “Sisters” for a few quid.

Best known for “Young at Heart” which hit No 1 in the UK when it was re-released in 1993 on the back of being used in a car advert, it’s a lovely little album that I think I only ever had a copy of on tape when I was a kid.

Here’s a couple of other singles from it, to get your Saturday off to a splendid start:

THE_BLUEBELLS_SISTERS-229825

The Bluebells – I’m Falling

The Bluebells – Cath

More soon.